The Son of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 204

his ears. With an oath, the Hon. Morison struggled
to a sitting posture. The rats retreated. He worked his legs beneath
him and came to his knees, and then, by superhuman effort, rose to his
feet. There he stood, reeling drunkenly, dripping with cold sweat.

"God!" he muttered, "what have I done to deserve--" He paused. What
had he done? He thought of the girl in another tent in that accursed
village. He was getting his deserts. He set his jaws firmly with the
realization. He would never complain again! At that moment he became
aware of voices raised angrily in the goatskin tent close beside the
hut in which he lay. One of them was a woman's. Could it be Meriem's?
The language was probably Arabic--he could not understand a word of it;
but the tones were hers.

He tried to think of some way of attracting her attention to his near
presence. If she could remove his bonds they might escape together--if
she wished to escape. That thought bothered him. He was not sure of
her status in the village. If she were the petted child of the
powerful Sheik then she would probably not care to escape. He must
know, definitely.

At the bungalow he had often heard Meriem sing God Save the King, as My
Dear accompanied her on the piano. Raising his voice he now hummed the
tune. Immediately he heard Meriem's voice from the tent. She spoke
rapidly.

"Good bye, Morison," she cried. "If God is good I shall be dead before
morning, for if I still live I shall be worse than dead after tonight."

Then he heard an angry exclamation in a man's voice, followed by the
sounds of a scuffle. Baynes went white with horror. He struggled
frantically again with his bonds. They were giving. A moment later
one hand was free. It was but the work of an instant then to loose the
other. Stooping, he untied the rope from his ankles, then he
straightened and started for the hut doorway bent on reaching Meriem's
side. As he stepped out into the night the figure of a huge black rose
and barred his progress.


When speed was required of him Korak depended upon no other muscles
than his own, and so it was that the moment Tantor had landed him
safely upon the same side of the river as lay the village of The Sheik,
the

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