The Son of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 131

the wild, free existence of
her earlier childhood.

Then would come again visions of Korak, and, tired at last of leaping
and swinging through the trees, she would stretch herself comfortably
upon a branch and dream. And presently, as today, she found the
features of Korak slowly dissolve and merge into those of another, and
the figure of a tanned, half-naked tarmangani become a khaki clothed
Englishman astride a hunting pony.

And while she dreamed there came to her ears from a distance, faintly,
the terrified bleating of a kid. Meriem was instantly alert. You or
I, even had we been able to hear the pitiful wail at so great distance,
could not have interpreted it; but to Meriem it meant a species of
terror that afflicts the ruminant when a carnivore is near and escape
impossible.

It had been both a pleasure and a sport of Korak's to rob Numa of his
prey whenever possible, and Meriem too had often joyed in the thrill
of snatching some dainty morsel almost from the very jaws of the king
of beasts. Now, at the sound of the kid's bleat, all the well
remembered thrills recurred. Instantly she was all excitement to play
again the game of hide and seek with death.

Quickly she loosened her riding skirt and tossed it aside--it was a
heavy handicap to successful travel in the trees. Her boots and
stockings followed the skirt, for the bare sole of the human foot does
not slip upon dry or even wet bark as does the hard leather of a boot.
She would have liked to discard her riding breeches also, but the
motherly admonitions of My Dear had convinced Meriem that it was not
good form to go naked through the world.

At her hip hung a hunting knife. Her rifle was still in its boot at
her pony's withers. Her revolver she had not brought.

The kid was still bleating as Meriem started rapidly in its direction,
which she knew was straight toward a certain water hole which had once
been famous as a rendezvous for lions. Of late there had been no
evidence of carnivora in the neighborhood of this drinking place; but
Meriem was positive that the bleating of the kid was due to the
presence of either lion or panther.

But she would soon know, for she was rapidly approaching the terrified
animal. She wondered as she hastened onward that the sounds continued
to come from the same point. Why did the kid not run away? And then
she came

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