The Return of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 47

and Monsieur Flaubert had drawn
near. They were interested spectators of this strange ending of a
strange duel. None spoke until De Coude had quite finished, then he
looked up at Tarzan.

"You are a very brave and chivalrous gentleman," he said. "I thank God
that I did not kill you."

De Coude was a Frenchman. Frenchmen are impulsive. He threw his arms
about Tarzan and embraced him. Monsieur Flaubert embraced D'Arnot.
There was no one to embrace the doctor. So possibly it was pique which
prompted him to interfere, and demand that he be permitted to dress
Tarzan's wounds.

"This gentleman was hit once at least," he said. "Possibly thrice."

"Twice," said Tarzan. "Once in the left shoulder, and again in the
left side--both flesh wounds, I think." But the doctor insisted upon
stretching him upon the sward, and tinkering with him until the wounds
were cleansed and the flow of blood checked.

One result of the duel was that they all rode back to Paris together in
D'Arnot's car, the best of friends. De Coude was so relieved to have
had this double assurance of his wife's loyalty that he felt no rancor
at all toward Tarzan. It is true that the latter had assumed much more
of the fault than was rightly his, but if he lied a little he may be
excused, for he lied in the service of a woman, and he lied like a
gentleman.

The ape-man was confined to his bed for several days. He felt that it
was foolish and unnecessary, but the doctor and D'Arnot took the matter
so to heart that he gave in to please them, though it made him laugh to
think of it.

"It is droll," he said to D'Arnot. "To lie abed because of a pin
prick! Why, when Bolgani, the king gorilla, tore me almost to pieces,
while I was still but a little boy, did I have a nice soft bed to lie
on? No, only the damp, rotting vegetation of the jungle. Hidden
beneath some friendly bush I lay for days and weeks with only Kala to
nurse me--poor, faithful Kala, who kept the insects from my wounds and
warned off the beasts of prey.

"When I called for water she brought it to me in her own mouth--the
only way she knew to carry it. There was no sterilized gauze, there
was no antiseptic bandage--there was nothing that would not have driven
our dear doctor mad to have seen. Yet

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