The People That Time Forgot

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

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...The People That Time Forgot


By

Edgar Rice Burroughs




Chapter 1

I am forced to admit that even though...

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...more or less mythical land, though
it is vouched for by an eminent navigator of the...

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...the
others; the last Bowen knew of them, there were six left, all told--the
mate Bradley, the...

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...men, but this man
Billings comes as close to my conception of what a regular man...

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...plenty of waterproof cable to reach from the ship's
dynamos to the cliff-top when the _Toreador_...

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...and as we approached, we all saw the line of
breakers broken by a long sweep...

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...expectant, our
eyes glued upon the towering summit above us. Hollis, who was now in
command,...

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...the
sunlight from above, and as I glanced quickly up, I saw a most terrific
creature swooping...

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...the base of the cliffs beyond which my party
awaited me. I knew how anxious...

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...reptiles even in this part of Caspak.
The creature dived for my right wing so quickly...

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...lived, they might some day come upon the ruined remnants of this
great plane hanging in...

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...be drawn from the
main object of my flight into premature and useless exploration. It
seemed...

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...many times I was
forced to pass through arms of the forest which extended to the...

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...abandoned its impetuous rush and was now sneaking
slowly toward us; while the girl, a long...

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...puts it, before it knew
that it was dead.

With the panther quite evidently conscious of the...

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...do her greater
justice by saying that she combined all of the finest lines that one
sees...

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...I had seen a woman of any sort or kind.

She said something to me in...

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...that to the numerous others who do it infinitely better than I
could hope to, and...

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...said:
"Ajor!"

"Ajor!" I repeated, and she laughed and struck her palms together.

Well, we knew each other's...

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...loose
rock to build my barricade against the frightful terrors of the night
to come.

I shall never...

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...sparkling eyes; it accentuated the graceful motions of her
gesturing arms and hands; it sparkled from...

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...the fierce and
snarling countenance of a gigantic bear. I have hunted silvertips in
the White...

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...knowledge of the effectiveness of firearms than I,
and therefore greater confidence in them, entreated me...

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...huge bulk
through the opening it had now made.

So now I took careful aim between its...

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...knife.



Chapter 3

When I awoke, it was daylight, and I found Ajor squatting before a fine
bed...

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...Ajor and I set out once more upon our northward
journey. We had gone but...

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...spend hours at
a time in hiding from one or another of the great beasts which...

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...by no means as much to be
feared as the huge beasts that roamed the surface...

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...her terror was so real when she spoke of the Wieroo and
the land of Oo-oh...

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...the
sight of these caverns, several of which could be easily barricaded,
decided us to halt until...

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...were several gay-colored feathers. As we struggled
to and fro, I was slowly gaining advantage...

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...others who were
positively handsome and whose bodies were quite hairless. The Alus are
all bearded,...

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...are interested; and to them,
while I do not apologize for my philosophizing, I humbly explain...

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...I broke into a
cold sweat in absolute conviction that some beast was close before me;
yet...

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...quite
forgot my own predicament, though I still struggled intermittently with
my bonds in vain endeavor to...

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...trembly little voice and flung herself
upon me, sobbing softly. I had not known that...

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...meaning of
the new caress, for she leaned forward in the dark and pressed her own
lips...

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...man had penetrated this far within the cliff, nor any
spoor of animals of other kinds.

It...

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...there was the other
chance that we might find our way to liberty.

There came a time...

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...crept close to me as I lay on the hard floor and pillowed her head
upon...

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...opening a few yards
ahead of us and a leaden sky beyond--a leaden sky from which...

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...country of Kro-lu--the archers. We
now had but to pass through the balance of the...

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...Tom," I explained, "and I am from a country beyond Caspak."
I thought it best to...

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...it and expecting it for a long
time; today I am a Kro-lu. Today I...

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...her with him.

Just as I thought I should have to fire, a chorus of screams...

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...he admitted, "for no Caspakian would
have permitted such an opportunity to escape him." This, however,...

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...us and were almost
certain to set upon Ajor. So we hastened down the narrow...

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...To-mar was very much of a
man--a savage, if you will, but none the less a...

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...a question which it had never occurred to me to propound
to Ajor. She asked...

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...my father's ears that
he was in league with the Wieroo; a hunter, returning late at...

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...sure that when all were true
cos-ata-lo there would have been evolved at last the true...

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...torn from
him, and he became very angry, so that he trembled and beat his wings
together...

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...I felt that I was lost. How far I was from the
country of the...

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...toward the
Kro-lu village.

This was our last day together. In the afternoon we should separate,
To-mar...

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...evolutionary stages of man. The diminutive
ecca, or small horse, became a rough-coated and sturdy...

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...would hit two, for another was directly behind the first.

Ajor touched my arm. "What...

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... Simultaneously with the thought
my pistol flew to position, a streak of incandescent powder marked...

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...in--I am not a
foe. I have no wish to be an enemy of any...

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...conclusion that he is batu. He has been chief
ever since, before I came up...

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...they looked with covetousness in the
one instance and suspicion in the other; but after they...

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...side of a six-inch tree fifty feet
away. Al-tan and his warriors turned toward me...

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...way. Al-tan will not hinder him."

I was not entirely reassured; but I wanted to...

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... The trophies that these
Kro-lu left to the meat-eaters would have turned an English big-game
hunter...

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...some unaccountable reason the
whole thing reminded me of a friend who once shot a cat...

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...Tyler's colored chef, who could make pork-chops taste like
chicken, and chicken taste like heaven.



Chapter 6

After...

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...and
ammunition aside as soon as we had taken over the hut, and I left them
with...

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...no savage enemy but a joyous friend, and
then I recognized him, and fell to one...

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...my
feet; but the instant that I turned to leave, he was up and after me.
Du-seen...

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...it out with the two of us had
not Al-tan drawn him to one side and...

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...my arms
and ammunition had been removed.

As the six men leaped upon me, an angry growl...

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...upon one side, I would
strike at his head with the stone hatchet from the other.

As...

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...apparel, by the habits and customs and
manners of her people, by her life, would have...

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...I cared little for my own safety
while she was in danger.

"Ajor is safe, too," he...

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...I spoke.

"Yes," agreed Chal-az, "you must go at once. It is almost dawn.
Du-seen leaves...

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...use both the noose and the honda.
If several warriors surround a single foeman or quarry,...

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...and drop to the ground
outside was the work of but a moment, or would have...

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...delay, for
they have a nasty habit of keeping one treed for an hour or more...

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...and a
calf, close beside a lone rhinoceros asleep in a dust-hole. Deer,
antelope, bison, horses,...

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...forms of military tactics. I was
surprised that even a man of the Stone Age...

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...night, and
below us was game--deer, sheep, anything that a hungry hunter might
crave; so down the...

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...convinced I became
that Ajor had not quitted the Kro-lu village; but if not, what had
brought...

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...turn
in my direction. At last it became evident that he was doing so, when
apparently...

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...me. He
did not bark, nor come rushing down upon them, and when he had...

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...certain self-confidence; lack of them induces panic.

But no beast attacked me, though I saw several...

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...stand while I stroked his
head and flanks, and to eat from my hand, and had...

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...open, and with Nobs running close
alongside, we raced toward her.

At first none of them saw...

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...It was
evident that we were doomed.

"Slay me!" begged Ajor. "Let me die at thy...

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...upon us,
when there broke from the wood beyond the swamp the sweetest music that
ever fell...

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...The holes slanted
slightly downward. Into these holes the iron rods brought as a part...

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...from the Kro-lu
country, now a full-fledged Galu. He told us that the remnants of
Al-tan's...

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...out through the wide gateway in the stone wall which surrounds the
city and on across...