The Outlaw of Torn

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 66

replied with haughty
scorn. "The same that it shall always be. I will be neither wife nor
mistress to a coward; a hideous, abhorrent pig of a man. I would die,
it seems, if I felt the touch of your hand upon me. You do not dare to
touch me, you craven. I, the daughter of an earl, the niece of a king,
wed to the warty toad, Peter of Colfax!"

"Hold, chit!" cried the Baron, livid with rage. "You have gone too far.
Enough of this; and you love me not now, I shall learn you to love ere
the sun rises." And with a vile oath he grasped the girl roughly by the
arm, and dragged her toward the little doorway at the side of the room.




CHAPTER X

For three weeks after his meeting with Bertrade de Montfort and his
sojourn at the castle of John de Stutevill, Norman of Torn was busy with
his wild horde in reducing and sacking the castle of John de Grey, a
royalist baron who had captured and hanged two of the outlaw's fighting
men; and never again after his meeting with the daughter of the chief of
the barons did Norman of Torn raise a hand against the rebels or their
friends.

Shortly after his return to Torn, following the successful outcome of
his expedition, the watch upon the tower reported the approach of a
dozen armed knights. Norman sent Red Shandy to the outer walls to learn
the mission of the party, for visitors seldom came to this inaccessible
and unhospitable fortress; and he well knew that no party of a dozen
knights would venture with hostile intent within the clutches of his
great band of villains.

The great red giant soon returned to say that it was Henry de Montfort,
oldest son of the Earl of Leicester, who had come under a flag of truce
and would have speech with the master of Torn.

"Admit them, Shandy," commanded Norman of Torn, "I will speak with them
here."

When the party, a few moments later, was ushered into his presence it
found itself facing a mailed knight with drawn visor.

Henry de Montfort advanced with haughty dignity until he faced the
outlaw.

"Be ye Norman of Torn?" he asked. And, did he try to conceal the hatred
and loathing which he felt, he was poorly successful.

"They call me so," replied the visored knight. "And what may bring a De
Montfort after so many years to visit his old neighbor?"

"Well ye know what brings me, Norman of Torn," replied the young man.
"It is useless to waste

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