The Outlaw of Torn

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 149

not the outlaw that I loved, Richard, nor be it the prince I
love now; it be all the same to me, prince or highwayman--it be thee I
love, dear heart--just thee."


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The following changes have been made:

PAGE LINE ORIGINAL CHANGED TO
17 17 merks marks
554 ertswhile erstwhile
591 so so do so
90 26 beats beasts
934 presntly presently
124 20 rescurer rescuer
171 27 walls." walls.
1843 gnetlemen gentlemen
185 20 fored, formed,
1866 to forces the forces
195 19 those father whose father
2172 precipitably precipitately
2175 litle little
221 30 Monfort Montfort
230 30 Montforth Montfort
245 15 muderer's murderer's






The only changes that have been made to this text by Publisher's Choice
Books and its General Manager/Editor have been the removal of all
word-breaking hyphenation, and the occasional addition of a comma to
separate certain phrases. These changes were effected merely to increase
the Reader's reading ease and enjoyment of the text.

The following spelling changes were effected within the text for

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