The Mucker

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 239

was there. He's the squarest guy
in the world, Bridge is. He follered me that night an' took a shot at
me, thinkin' I was the robber all right but not knowin' I was me. He
got my horse, an' when he found it was me, he made me take your pony an'
make my get-away, fer he knew Villa's men would croak me sure if they
caught me. You can't blame him fer that, can you? Him an' I were good
pals--he couldn't do nothin' else. It was him that made me bring your
pony back to you. It's in the corral now, I reckon. I was a-bringin' it
back when they got me. Now you better go. This ain't no place fer you,
an' I ain't had no sleep fer so long I'm most dead." His tones were
cool. He appeared bored by her company; though as a matter of fact
his heart was breaking with love for her--love that he believed
unrequited--and he yearned to tear loose his bonds and crush her in his
arms.

It was Barbara's turn now to be hurt. She drew herself up.

"I am sorry that I have disturbed your rest," she said, and walked away,
her head in the air; but all the way back to the ranchhouse she kept
repeating over and over to herself: "Tomorrow they will shoot him!
Tomorrow they will shoot him! Tomorrow they will shoot him!"



CHAPTER XIV. 'TWIXT LOVE AND DUTY

FOR an hour Barbara Harding paced the veranda of the ranchhouse, pride
and love battling for the ascendency within her breast. She could not
let him die, that she knew; but how might she save him?

The strains of music and the laughter from the bunkhouse had ceased. The
ranch slept. Over the brow of the low bluff upon the opposite side of
the river a little party of silent horsemen filed downward to the ford.
At the bluff's foot a barbed-wire fence marked the eastern boundary of
the ranch's enclosed fields. The foremost horseman dismounted and cut
the strands of wire, carrying them to one side from the path of the feet
of the horses which now passed through the opening he had made.

Down into the river they rode following the ford even in the darkness
with an assurance which indicated long familiarity. Then through a
fringe of willows out across a meadow toward the ranch buildings
the riders made their way. The manner of their approach, their utter
silence, the hour, all contributed toward the sinister.

Upon the veranda of the ranchhouse Barbara Harding came to

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Thuvia, Maid of Mars

Page 12
"It is done, Vas Kor," he said, handing a small metal key to the tall noble who had just risen from his sleeping silks and furs.
Page 18
The breaking of the sudden dawn found him still asleep.
Page 24
Turning quickly toward his flier, he was soon rising from the plaza in pursuit of Thar Ban.
Page 33
Then he was in the midst of the astonished Torquasians.
Page 39
He threw an arm about her, and thus they crossed the field.
Page 42
Within, the avenue leading to the main building was lined on either side by ranks of bowmen.
Page 44
Some one shall pay well for this, Jav, and unless I mistake it is yourself who has dared thus flippantly to trifle with the good nature of your jeddak.
Page 48
"So the essence must be substance," continued Jav.
Page 64
But thereafter, until I dissolve them, they are as actual as you or I.
Page 65
"I tell you he has fled the valley.
Page 68
Being a creature of his mind, I know him too well.
Page 71
He regretted now that he had not thought to give Kar Komak one of his swords; but it was too late to attempt it, for should he wait for the Lotharian to overtake him or return to meet him, the Torquasians would reach Thuvia of Ptarth before he could do so.
Page 80
"By your appearance I take you for a fighting man, but I see no insignia upon your harness.
Page 83
Quickly the swift boats shot heavenward.
Page 84
It occurred to him to test his father's sentiments upon the subject, and so he told a tale of capturing one who claimed to know the whereabouts of Thuvia of Ptarth.
Page 93
" It was dark upon the deck of the Kalksus, so Vas Kor had not a good look at the faces of the two he chose; but that was of no moment, for they were but common warriors to assist with the ordinary duties upon a flier, and to fight if need be.
Page 96
There was no escape.
Page 98
Vas Kor, dreaming no treachery, nodded his head, and for a moment succeeded in holding Carthoris at bay.
Page 99
No, they had not left the apartment.
Page 107
(See THE GODS OF MARS.