The Mucker

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 121

He shook his
head.

"There is something familiar about your face," he said; "but I cannot
place you. Nor does it make any difference who you are--you have risked
your life to save ours and I shall not leave you. Let Mr. Harding go--it
is not necessary for both to stay."

"You will both go," insisted Byrne; "and you will find that it does
make a big difference who I am. I hadn't intended telling you, but I see
there is no other way. I'm the mucker that nearly killed you on board
the Lotus, Mallory. I'm the fellow that man-handled Miss Harding until
even that beast of a Simms made me quit, and Miss Harding has been alone
with me on this island for weeks--now go!"

He turned away so that they could no longer see his face, with the
mental anguish that he knew must be writ large upon it, and commenced
firing toward the natives once more.

Anthony Harding stood with white face and clinched hands during Byrne's
recital of his identity. At its close he took a threatening step toward
the prostrate man, raising his long sword, with a muffled oath. Billy
Mallory sprang before him, catching his upraised arm.

"Don't!" he whispered. "Think what we owe him now. Come!" and the two
men turned north into the jungle while Billy Byrne lay upon his belly
in the tall grass firing from time to time into the direction from which
came an occasional spear.

Anthony Harding and Billy Mallory kept on in silence along their dismal
way. The crack of the mucker's revolver, growing fainter and fainter, as
they drew away from the scene of conflict, apprised the men that their
rescuer still lived.

After a time the distant reports ceased. The two walked on in silence
for a few minutes.

"He's gone," whispered Mallory.

Anthony Harding made no response. They did not hear any further firing
behind them. On and on they trudged. Night turned to day. Day rolled
slowly on into night once more. And still they staggered on, footsore
and weary. Mallory suffered excruciating agony from his wound. There
were times when it seemed that it would be impossible for him to
continue another yard; but then the thought that Barbara Harding was
somewhere ahead of them, and that in a short time now they must be with
her once more kept him doggedly at his painful task.

They had reached the river and were following slowly down its bank. The
moon, full and gorgeous, flooded the landscape with silvery light.

"Look!" exclaimed Mallory. "The island!"

"Thank God!" whispered Harding, fervently.

On the bank opposite

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Mad King

Page 12
It was pitiful to think that this big, handsome young man, for whose return to the throne all Lutha had prayed for ten long years, was only a silly half-wit.
Page 28
There is a bare chance that we may succeed in rescuing her, but a very bare one, indeed.
Page 35
Long before his pursuers had reached the courtyard and alarmed the watch at the barbican, the American had crawled out upon dry land and hastened across the broad clearing to the patch of stunted trees that grew lower down upon the steep hillside before the castle.
Page 43
"I've got private business with this king.
Page 57
" "Prince Ludwig von der Tann has gone to attend the coronation of Peter!" cried Barney in amazement.
Page 60
I doubt much that you will ever sit upon your throne, sire, unless you do so within the very next hour.
Page 62
The solemn ceremony was all but completed; the Bishop of Lustadt had received the great golden crown from the purple cushion upon which it had been borne at the head of the procession which accompanied Peter up the broad center aisle of the cathedral.
Page 64
There were cries from different parts of the cathedral of: "Crown Leopold, our true king! Down with Peter! Down with the assassin!" "Enough of this," cried Peter.
Page 68
wear clothes that had been fitted to Barney; and it was part of his plan to have everything in readiness for the substitution which was to take place the morning of the coronation.
Page 93
It is not my fault that I loved you.
Page 108
Then a soft voice floated down to him--a woman's voice! "Is that you?" The tongue was Serbian.
Page 112
He started on a rapid trot toward the adjoining roof.
Page 117
the hollows of the men's shoulders.
Page 125
Looking neither to right nor to left, and with a convincing air of self-confidence and important business, he walked directly to the big, gray machine that stood beside the little shed at the end of the courtyard.
Page 129
Von der Tann returned his salutations with courtesy but with no answering warmth.
Page 156
At the outskirts of the town they were challenged by Austrian sentries, through which Maenck passed with ease after the sentinel had summoned an officer.
Page 161
At his back now was the great oil painting of the Blentz princess that had hid the secret entrance to the room.
Page 169
For two years he and the Luthanian officer had been inseparable.
Page 194
None will.
Page 205
Directly opposite him upon the wall was a dark-toned photogravure of a hunting scene.