The Lost Continent

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

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...The Lost Continent was originally published
under the title Beyond Thirty




THE LOST...

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...175d is
ours--from 30d to 175d is peace, prosperity and happiness.

Beyond was the great unknown. ...

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...story
in a less formal, and I hope, a more entertaining, style; though, being
only a naval...

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...unpeopled spaces of the mighty oceans. And so I
joined the navy, coming up from...

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...entered and saluted. His
face was grave, and I thought he was even a trifle...

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...thirty or one hundred seventy-five has been, as you know, the
direst calamity that could befall...

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...settled into the
frightful Maelstrom beneath us and at the same time mentally computing
the hours which...

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...closer and closer to those stupendous waves. He
watched my every move, but he was...

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...I recalled subsequently.

Not three minutes after his reappearance at my side the Coldwater
suddenly commenced to...

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...that Lieutenant Jefferson
Turck had taken his ship across thirty, every man aboard would know
that the...

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...degradation and discharge because a lot
of old, preglacial fossils had declared over two hundred years...

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...him that
my gratitude was no less potent a force than his loyalty to me. ...

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...personally announced
it to the eager, waiting men.

"Men," I said, stepping forward to the handrail and...

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...complement of men--three in all,
and more than enough to handle any small power boat. ...

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...attention,
though I knew full well that all who cared to had observed us, but the
ship...

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...cruise, and this time, among others, I have maps of
Europe and her surrounding waters. ...

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...the third day that we raised land, dead ahead, which I
took, from my map, to...

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...Up the bay and into the River Tamar we
motored through a solitude as unbroken as...

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...and following my example, each engaged in the fascinating
sport of prospecting for antiques. Each...

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...go up the river and fill our casks with
fresh water, search for food and fuel,...

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...forward, shouting,
to attract the beast's attention from Delcarte until we should all be
quite close enough...

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...of our bullets, or one of the last that Delcarte fired, had
penetrated the heart, and...

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...I agreed, "for their extreme boldness and
fearlessness in the presence of man would suggest either...

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...stopping place was the Isle of Wight. We entered the Solent
about ten o'clock one...

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...score of wild savages charging
down upon us, where I had expected to find a community...

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...a place where many people lived together in houses.

"Oh," he exclaimed, "you mean a camp!...

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...sea food as is obtainable close to
shore, for they had no boats, nor any knowledge...

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...or Rio, or San Diego, or Valparaiso. They had
become what they are today during...

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...from the stuffed, unnatural
specimens preserved to us in our museums.

But presently I guessed the identity...

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...brief moments as I
stood there in rapt fascination! I had come to find a...

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...him, and as he struggled to rise,
clawing viciously at me, I put a bullet in...

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...I watched them as they approached
the tree. There were about thirty men in the...

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...tree, I stepped out in sight of the
advancing foe, shouting to them that I was...

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...her strange request,
I did as she bid, she appeared relieved. Then she edged to...

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...wrought to have erased not only every sign of
civilization from the face of this great...

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...maniac.

But I am forgetting the continuity of my narrative--a continuity which
I desire to maintain, though...

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...Camp of the
Lions has places of stone where the beasts lair, but there are no
people...

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...you if Buckingham gets his hands on you. He is a bad
man. He...

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...side, she gazed commiseratingly at me.

"It is too bad that you did not do as...

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...to believe that
I was not among my own. It was only when I took...

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...a coward. If I could help you I should
gladly do so. But I...

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...have my doubts.

Finally, I came to the conclusion that I was absolutely friendless
except for the...

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...screaming and moaning. After a time this subsided, and again
there was a long interval...

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...and superstition had the vaunted civilization of
twentieth century England been plunged, and by what? ...

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...one of the party in a
voice husky with awe.

Here the party knelt, while Buckingham recited...

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...in review before my mind's
eye.

I tried to imagine the astonishment, incredulity, and horror with which
my...

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...beast crumpled and rolled, lifeless, to the
ground, I went upon my knees and gave thanks...

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...be escaped.

"Would they follow us there?" I asked, pointing through the archway
into the Camp of...

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...larger. The bridge
would be there in part, at least, and so would remain the...

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...hand in hand, while
Victory asked many questions and for the first time I began to...

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... All were roaring now, and the din of their great voices
reverberating through the halls...

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...stood a flat-topped desk. A
little pile of white and brown lay upon it close...

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...the continent? All
gone--only I remain. I promised his majesty, and when he returns he
will...

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...beautiful one.

And so, though I wished a thousand times that she was back in her...

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...male raised his head, and, with cocked ears and
glaring eyes, gazed straight at the bush...

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...that she
would turn off in some other direction. But no--she increased her trot
to a...

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...but she shook her head.

The lioness was overhauling us rapidly. She was swimming silently,...

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...thing you call rifle stunned her,"
she explained, "and then I swam in close enough to...

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...thought I heard the howl of a beast north of us--it
might have been a wolf.

Altogether,...

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...of an enemy, but a moment later he recognized me, and
was coming rapidly to meet...

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...determine what course
we should pursue in the immediate future. Snider was still for setting
out...

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...legacy from
the bloody days when thousands of men perished in the trenches between
the rising and...

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...the type of man he was. But as it would
not be necessary ever to...

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...to explore the Rhine as far up as the launch would take
us. If we...

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...of the view with the crack of a rifle and the death
of one of those...

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... Running toward it, I saw that it was
Thirty-six, and as I stopped and raised...

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...to my duty and responsibility as an officer.

The utter hopelessness that was reflected in his...

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...while I, although fully conscious of the gravity
of his offense, could not bring myself to...

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... "I see no one in it."

I was stripping off my clothes, and Delcarte soon...

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...our former camping place, we did
not find her. I then decided to retrace our...

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...which seemed strange to me. But
when, late in the afternoon, we arrived at their...

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...Delcarte, of Taylor I could not know;
nor did it seem likely that I should ever...

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...to learn.

A couple of soldiers snapped the first ring around the neck of a
powerful white...

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...his sovereign's displeasure.

Some fifty years before, the young emperor, Menelek XIV, was ambitious.
He knew that...

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...little white colonies, and a
black who marries a white is socially ostracized.

The arms and ammunition...

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...the mobilizing of such a force as we presently met
with converging from the south into...

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...Gondar, talking
with the inhabitants, and exploring the city of black men.

As I had been given...

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...gifts brought in from the far outlying districts by
the commanding officers of the frontier posts....

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...his headquarters in the
stone building that was called the palace. That night came a...

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...to the floor. Then came the official's
voice again, in sharp and peremptory command.

"Down, slave!"...

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...not bend the knee to me?" continued Menelek, after she
had spoken. Victory shook her...

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...figure of a little heathen
maiden. I couldn't account for it, and it angered me;...

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...clubbed his rifle and felled him with a single
mighty blow.

A moment later, I had burst...

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...a second. There was a rending
crash above us, then a deafening explosion within the...

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...to push me
from her. "You called me a barbarian!" she said.

Ah, so that was...

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...multitudes of men, women, and
children fleeing toward the west. Soldiers, afoot and mounted, were
joining...

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...that we were prisoners before we
realized what had happened. That night we were held...

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...told me that he would telegraph his emperor at once, and the result
was that we...

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...be such another war!"

You all know how Porfirio Johnson returned to Pan-America with John
Alvarez in...