The Land That Time Forgot

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 73

watched
them from our "apartment," as Lys called it. Neither men nor women wore
any sort of clothing or ornaments, and they all seemed to be about of
an age; nor were there any babies or children among them. This was, to
us, the strangest and most inexplicable of facts, but it recalled to us
that though we had seen many of the lesser developed wild people of
Caspak, we had never yet seen a child or an old man or woman.

After a while they became less suspicious of us and then quite friendly
in their brutish way. They picked at the fabric of our clothing, which
seemed to interest them, and examined my rifle and pistol and the
ammunition in the belt around my waist. I showed them the
thermos-bottle, and when I poured a little water from it, they were
delighted, thinking that it was a spring which I carried about with
me--a never-failing source of water supply.

One thing we both noticed among their other characteristics: they never
laughed nor smiled; and then we remembered that Ahm had never done so,
either. I asked them if they knew Ahm; but they said they did not.

One of them said: "Back there we may have known him." And he jerked
his head to the south.

"You came from back there?" I asked. He looked at me in surprise.

"We all come from there," he said. "After a while we go there." And
this time he jerked his head toward the north. "Be Galus," he
concluded.

Many times now had we heard this reference to becoming Galus. Ahm had
spoken of it many times. Lys and I decided that it was a sort of
original religious conviction, as much a part of them as their instinct
for self-preservation--a primal acceptance of a hereafter and a holier
state. It was a brilliant theory, but it was all wrong. I know it
now, and how far we were from guessing the wonderful, the miraculous,
the gigantic truth which even yet I may only guess at--the thing that
sets Caspak apart from all the rest of the world far more definitely
than her isolated geographical position or her impregnable barrier of
giant cliffs. If I could live to return to civilization, I should have
meat for the clergy and the layman to chew upon for years--and for the
evolutionists, too.

After breakfast the men set out to hunt, while the women went to a
large pool of warm water covered with a green scum

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Efficiency Expert

Page 2
average of your academic standing.
Page 9
"I ain't done nuthin'," muttered the man.
Page 17
I already have applications from a dozen or more fellows, half of whom have had experience, and one in particular, whom I have about decided to employ, held a similar position with another life-insurance company.
Page 23
Both labor and raw materials have advanced, but we have advanced our prices correspondingly.
Page 25
Your father is not an old man in years, but he has placed a constant surtax on his nervous system for the last twenty-five.
Page 34
There was a nasty expression on his face and in his mind a thing which he did not dare voice--the final crystallization of a suspicion that he had long harbored, that his companions had been for months deliberately fleecing him.
Page 35
It has helped me materially to win to my present exalted standing in society.
Page 36
Feinheimer's Cabaret held a unique place among the restaurants of the city.
Page 43
You get back on your job, where you belong," and the man pressed forward trying to push Jimmy aside and lay hands on Elizabeth again.
Page 51
Morally they're a bunch of thieves and crooks.
Page 53
He had driven for about a week when, upon coming into the barn after completing his morning delivery, he was instructed to take a special order to a certain address on Lake Shore Drive.
Page 58
"Oh," he said, "he's a long way off and--if I'm no good to any one here I certainly wouldn't be any good to him.
Page 59
Compton?" he asked.
Page 61
Now, what arrangement can we make?" Jimmy had given the matter of pay considerable thought, but the trouble was that he did not know what an efficiency expert might be expected to demand.
Page 64
"And just how, may I ask, do you make environment count on the balance-sheet? I do not quite understand.
Page 75
"Yes," replied the girl, "he has been here some time.
Page 85
" Jimmy quickly forced a smile to his lips.
Page 97
The last time I saw him was at my father's home.
Page 108
That was just a little joke.
Page 109
He stopped at the front door and lighted a cigarette and then he went on out, and I went up-stairs to finish the job.