The Land That Time Forgot

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 51

out to hunt for game
and explore inland for a short distance. Olson, von Schoenvorts, two
Englishmen and two Germans accompanied me, leaving ten to guard the
ship and the girl. I had intended leaving Nobs behind, but he got away
and joined me and was so happy over it that I hadn't the heart to send
him back. We followed the stream upward through a beautiful country
for about five miles, and then came upon its source in a little
boulder-strewn clearing. From among the rocks bubbled fully twenty
ice-cold springs. North of the clearing rose sandstone cliffs to a
height of some fifty to seventy-five feet, with tall trees growing at
their base and almost concealing them from our view. To the west the
country was flat and sparsely wooded, and here it was that we saw our
first game--a large red deer. It was grazing away from us and had not
seen us when one of my men called my attention to it. Motioning for
silence and having the rest of the party lie down, I crept toward the
quarry, accompanied only by Whitely. We got within a hundred yards of
the deer when he suddenly raised his antlered head and pricked up his
great ears. We both fired at once and had the satisfaction of seeing
the buck drop; then we ran forward to finish him with our knives. The
deer lay in a small open space close to a clump of acacias, and we had
advanced to within several yards of our kill when we both halted
suddenly and simultaneously. Whitely looked at me, and I looked at
Whitely, and then we both looked back in the direction of the deer.

"Blime!" he said. "Wot is hit, sir?"

"It looks to me, Whitely, like an error," I said; "some assistant god
who had been creating elephants must have been temporarily transferred
to the lizard-department."

"Hi wouldn't s'y that, sir," said Whitely; "it sounds blasphemous."

"It is no more blasphemous than that thing which is swiping our meat," I
replied, for whatever the thing was, it had leaped upon our deer and
was devouring it in great mouthfuls which it swallowed without
mastication. The creature appeared to be a great lizard at least ten
feet high, with a huge, powerful tail as long as its torso, mighty hind
legs and short forelegs. When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped
much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to
propel it, and when

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Contents # Foreword - 00:07:47 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 01 - 00:16:45 Read by: Peter Yearsley # Chapter 02 - 00:09:42 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 03 - 00:18:32 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 04 - 00:13:49 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 05 - 00:09:17 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 06 - 00:11:11 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 07 - 00:14:28 Read by: Kara Shallenberg # Chapter 08 - 00:11:36 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 09 - 00:07:59 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 10 - 00:19:11 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 11 - 00:17:02 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 12 - 00:13:49 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 13 - 00:13:17 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 14 - 00:21:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 15 - 00:20:57 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 16 - 00:23:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 17 - 00:19:03 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 18 - 00:10:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 19 - 00:14:28 Read by: Chris Vee # Chapter 20 - 00:16:33 Read by: Patrick McNeal # Chapter 21 - 00:21:45 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 22 - 00:23:47 Read by: Sherry Crowther # Chapter 23 - 00:13:24 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 24 - 00:16:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 25 - 00:11:59 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 26 - 00:14:52 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 27 - 00:11:41 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 28 - 00:05:31 Read by: Stephan Moebius Librivox Audio Recording Public Domain Certification: The person or persons who have associated work with this document (the "Dedicator" or "Certifier") hereby either (a) certifies that, to the best of his knowledge, the work of authorship identified is in the public domain of the country from which the work is published, or (b) hereby dedicates whatever copyright the dedicators holds in the work of authorship identified below (the "Work") to the public domain.
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