The Gods of Mars

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 0

Thanks to Al Haines, based on the
non-illustrated version, at
http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/64










[Frontispiece: The cold hollow eye of a revolver sought the center
of my forehead.]





THE GODS OF MARS


BY

EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS


AUTHOR OF

TARZAN OF THE APES,
A PRINCESS OF MARS, Etc.



FRONTISPIECE BY

FRANK E. SCHOONOVER



NEW YORK

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS




Copyright

A. C. McClurg & Co.


Published September, 1918




CONTENTS

I. The Plant Men
II. A Forest Battle
III. The Chamber of Mystery
IV. Thuvia
V. Corridors of Peril
VI. The Black Pirates of Barsoom
VII. A Fair Goddess
VIII. The Depths of Omean
IX. Issus, Goddess of Life Eternal
X. The Prison Isle of Shador
XI. When Hell Broke Loose
XII. Doomed to Die
XIII. A Break for Liberty
XIV. The Eyes in the Dark
XV. Flight and Pursuit
XVI. Under Arrest
XVII. The Death Sentence
XVIII. Sola's Story
XIX. Black Despair
XX. The Air Battle
XXI. Through Flood and Flame
XXII. Victory and Defeat




FOREWORD


Twelve years had passed since I had laid the body of my great-uncle,
Captain John Carter, of Virginia, away from the sight of men in that
strange mausoleum in the old cemetery at Richmond.

Often had I pondered on the odd instructions he had left me governing
the construction of his mighty tomb, and especially those parts which
directed that he be laid in an _open_ casket and that the ponderous
mechanism which controlled the bolts of the vault's huge door be
accessible _only from the inside_.

Twelve years had passed since I had read the remarkable manuscript of
this remarkable man; this man who remembered no childhood and who could
not even offer a vague guess as to his age; who was always young and
yet who had dandled my grandfather's great-grandfather upon his knee;
this man who had spent ten years upon the planet Mars; who had fought
for the green men of Barsoom and fought against them; who had fought
for and against the red men and who had won the ever beautiful Dejah
Thoris, Princess of Helium, for his wife, and for nearly ten years had
been a prince of the house of Tardos Mors, Jeddak of Helium.

Twelve

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