The Efficiency Expert

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 74

said the other, "I don't."

"Neither do I," said Bince. "I know his plans even better than you.
This shop has short hours and good pay, but if we don't get rid of him
it will have the longest hours and lowest pay of any shop in the city."

"Well?" questioned Krovac.

"I think," said Bince, "that there ought to be some way to prevent this
man doing any further harm here."

He looked straight into Krovac's eyes.

"There is," muttered the latter.

"It would be worth something of course," suggested Bince. "How much?"
asked Krovac.

"Oh, I should think it ought to be worth a hundred dollars," replied
Bince.

Krovac thought for a moment.

"I think I can arrange it," he said, "but I would have to have fifty
now."

"I cannot give it to you here," said Bince, "but if I should happen to
pass through the shop this afternoon you might find an envelope on the
floor beside your machine after I have gone."

The following evening as Jimmy alighted from the Indiana Avenue car at
Eighteenth Street, two men left the car behind him. He did not notice
them, although, as he made his way toward his boarding-house, he heard
footsteps directly in his rear, and suddenly noting that they were
approaching him rapidly, he involuntarily cast a glance behind him just
as one of the men raised an arm to strike at him with what appeared to
be a short piece of pipe.

Jimmy dodged the blow and then both men sprang for him. The first one
Jimmy caught on the point of the chin with a blow that put its recipient
out of the fight before he got into it, and then his companion, who was
the larger, succeeded in closing with the efficiency expert.
Inadvertently, however, he caught Jimmy about the neck, leaving both his
intended victim's arms free with the result that the latter was able to
seize his antagonist low down about the body, and then pressing him
close to him and hurling himself suddenly forward, he threw the fellow
backward upon the cement sidewalk with his own body on top. With a
resounding whack the attacker's head came in contact with the concrete,
his arms relaxed their hold upon Jimmy's neck, and as the latter arose
he saw both his assailants, temporarily at least, out of the fighting.

Jimmy glanced hastily in both directions. There was no one in sight.
His boardinghouse was but a few steps away, and two minutes later he was
safe in his room.

"A year ago," he thought to himself, smiling, "my first thought

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