The Efficiency Expert

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 28

I am not
satisfied. I am going to er--ah--accept another position."

The buyer raised his eyebrows. "Ah!" he said. "With--" and he named
their closest competitor.

"No," said Jimmy. "I am going to get a regular he-job."

The other smiled. "If an increase in salary," he suggested, "would
influence you, I had intended to tell you that I would take care of you
beginning next week. I thought of making it fifteen dollars," and with
that unanswerable argument for Jimmy's continued service the buyer sat
back and folded his hands.

"Nothing stirring," said Jimmy. "I wouldn't sell another sock if you
paid me ten thousand dollars a year. I am through."

"Oh, very well," said the buyer aggrievedly, "but if you leave me this
way you will be unable to refer to the house."

But nothing, not even a team of oxen, could have held Jimmy in that
section another minute, and so he got his pay and left with nothing more
in view than a slow death by starvation.

"There," exclaimed Elizabeth Compton, as she sank back on the cushions
of her car.

"There what?" asked Harriet.

"I have placed him."

"Whom?"

"That nice-looking young person who waited on us in the hosiery
section."

"Oh!" said Harriet. "He was nice-looking, wasn't he? But he looked out
of place there, and I think he felt out of place. Did you notice how he
flushed when he asked you what size?" and the girls laughed heartily at
the recollection. "But where have you ever met him before?" Harriet
asked.

"I have never met him," corrected Elizabeth, accenting the "met." "He
changed a wheel on the roadster several weeks ago one evening after I
had taken Harold down to the club. And he was very nice about it. I
should say that he is a gentleman, although his clothes were pretty
badly worn."

"Yes," said Harriet, "his suit was shabby, but his linen was clean and
his coat well brushed."

"My!" exclaimed Elizabeth. "He must have made an impression on some
one."

"Well," said Harriet, "it isn't often you see such a nice-looking chap
in the hosiery section."

"No," said Elizabeth, "and probably if he were as nice as he looks he
wouldn't be there."

Whereupon the subject was changed, and she promptly forgot Mr. Jimmy
Torrance. But Jimmy was not destined soon to forget her, for as the
jobless days passed and he realized more and more what an ass he had
made of himself, and why, he had occasion to think about her a great
deal, although never in any sense reproaching her. He realized that the
fault

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Text Comparison with Warlord of Mars

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