The Chessmen of Mars

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 114

doubtless accounts
for their treatment of us, their slaves."

"But why should they feel contempt for those who have suffered the
misfortune of falling into their hands?" queried Tara.

"I do not know," said Lan-O; "A-Kor says that he believes that it is
because their country has never been invaded by a victorious foe. In
their stealthy raids never have they been defeated, because they have
never waited to face a powerful force; and so they have come to believe
themselves invincible, and the other peoples are held in contempt as
inferior in valor and the practice of arms."

"Yet A-Kor is one of them," said Tara.

"He is a son of O-Tar, the jeddak," replied Lan-O; "but his mother was
a high born Gatholian, captured and made slave by O-Tar, and A-Kor
boasts that in his veins runs only the blood of his mother, and indeed
is he different from the others. His chivalry is of a gentler form,
though not even his worst enemy has dared question his courage, while
his skill with the sword, and the spear, and the thoat is famous
throughout the length and breadth of Manator."

"What think you they will do with him?" asked Tara of Helium.

"Sentence him to the games," replied Lan-O. "If O-Tar be not greatly
angered he may be sentenced to but a single game, in which case he may
come out alive; but if O-Tar wishes really to dispose of him he will be
sentenced to the entire series, and no warrior has ever survived the
full ten, or rather none who was under a sentence from O-Tar."

"What are the games? I do not understand," said Tara "I have heard them
speak of playing at jetan, but surely no one can be killed at jetan. We
play it often at home."

"But not as they play it in the arena at Manator," replied Lan-O. "Come
to the window," and together the two approached an aperture facing
toward the east.

Below her Tara of Helium saw a great field entirely surrounded by the
low building, and the lofty towers of which that in which she was
imprisoned was but a unit. About the arena were tiers of seats; but the
thing that caught her attention was a gigantic jetan board laid out
upon the floor of the arena in great squares of alternate orange and
black.

"Here they play at jetan with living pieces. They play for great stakes
and usually for a woman--some slave of exceptional beauty. O-Tar
himself might have played for you had you not angered him, but now you
will be played for

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with Thuvia, Maid of Mars

Page 5
"I told you that I loved you, Thuvia, before I knew that you were promised to another.
Page 6
He had come alone in a small flier, sure of the same welcome that always awaited him at Ptarth.
Page 12
"Man builds naught," he said, "that man may not destroy.
Page 20
the little craft to whose deck the Princess of Ptarth had been snatched from her father's garden, Thuvia saw that the night had wrought a change in her abductors.
Page 27
Before him he could hear the occasional low moans of the banth, and presently from behind came a similar uncanny note.
Page 37
"It is impossible!" replied Carthoris.
Page 41
"We saw thousands emerge from this very gate, overwhelming the hordes of Torquas and putting them to rout with their deadly arrows and their fierce banths.
Page 42
" "I cannot account for it," replied Carthoris, "unless we have gone mad.
Page 43
A haughty smile curved his lips.
Page 49
I made them take aim at the hearts of the green men.
Page 56
"Die!" and then he turned toward the exit at his back.
Page 61
instant, then, with a wave of his hand, cried: "Look!" The sight that met them was awe-inspiring.
Page 66
The prince bent low to note if any spark of life remained, and as he did so the lids raised and dull, suffering eyes looked up into his.
Page 67
He did not know that in the face of the circumstantial evidence against him even his own people had commenced to entertain suspicions that he might have stolen the Ptarthian princess.
Page 68
He asserted that matter was nonexistent except in the imagination of man--that all was mental, and so he believed that by persisting in his suggestion he could eventually make of me a permanent suggestion in the minds of all creatures.
Page 78
The temper of the thoats of Torquas appeared even shorter than their vicious cousins among the Tharks and Warhoons, and for a time it seemed unlikely that he should escape a savage charge on the part of a couple of old bulls that circled, squealing, about him;.
Page 87
"Know the truth before you speak words that may seal, not only your own fate, but that of the thousands of warriors who battle because of you.
Page 89
I came upon him in the pits of Aaanthor; but though I have known him so short a time, I can vouch for his bravery and loyalty.
Page 103
"Kar Komak--the man!" he shouted.
Page 110
Xodar.