The Beasts of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 97

had upon Jane
Clayton would she but permit him to share this means of escape that she
had discovered. He would promise anything if she would let him come
aboard the dugout, but he did not think that it was necessary to do so.

He saw that he could easily reach the bow of the boat before it cleared
the shore, and then it would not be necessary to make promises of any
sort. Not that Rokoff would have felt the slightest compunction in
ignoring any promises he might have made the girl, but he disliked the
idea of having to sue for favour with one who had so recently assaulted
and escaped him.

Already he was gloating over the days and nights of revenge that would
be his while the heavy dugout drifted its slow way to the ocean.

Jane Clayton, working furiously to shove the boat beyond his reach,
suddenly realized that she was to be successful, for with a little
lurch the dugout swung quickly into the current, just as the Russian
reached out to place his hand upon its bow.

His fingers did not miss their goal by a half-dozen inches. The girl
almost collapsed with the reaction from the terrific mental, physical,
and nervous strain under which she had been labouring for the past few
minutes. But, thank Heaven, at last she was safe!

Even as she breathed a silent prayer of thanksgiving, she saw a sudden
expression of triumph lighten the features of the cursing Russian, and
at the same instant he dropped suddenly to the ground, grasping firmly
upon something which wriggled through the mud toward the water.

Jane Clayton crouched, wide-eyed and horror-stricken, in the bottom of
the boat as she realized that at the last instant success had been
turned to failure, and that she was indeed again in the power of the
malignant Rokoff.

For the thing that the man had seen and grasped was the end of the
trailing rope with which the dugout had been moored to the tree.




Chapter 15

Down the Ugambi


Halfway between the Ugambi and the village of the Waganwazam, Tarzan
came upon the pack moving slowly along his old spoor. Mugambi could
scarce believe that the trail of the Russian and the mate of his savage
master had passed so close to that of the pack.

It seemed incredible that two human beings should have come so close to
them without having been detected by some of the marvellously keen and
alert beasts; but Tarzan pointed out the spoor of the two he trailed,
and

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Mucker

Page 1
The two were rolling about in the dust of the alley quite as often as they were upon their feet exchanging blows.
Page 4
make him mad--before he had been but peeved--peeved at the rank crust that had permitted these cheap-skates from south of Twelfth Street to work his territory.
Page 15
If you wish I'll call upon him and invite him to dinner tonight.
Page 17
Together they gathered up their belongings, descended to the office, paid their bill, and a few moments later were changing back to their sea clothes in the little hotel where they first had engaged accommodations.
Page 46
"I cannot see that we are either through it handily or through it at all.
Page 48
Love she thought it; but the eye-light of love and lust are twin lights between which it takes much worldly wisdom to differentiate, and Barbara Harding was not worldly-wise in the ways of sin.
Page 84
First let's tie and gag this young heathen, and then we can proceed to business without fear of alarm from him," and the Frenchman stripped a long, grass rope from about the waist of his prisoner, with which he was securely trussed up, a piece of his loin cloth being forced into his mouth as a gag, and secured there by another strip, torn from the same garment, which was passed around the back of the boy's head.
Page 92
"If you molest us no further we shall not harm him," cried Barbara, "and when we leave your island we shall set him free; but renew your attack upon us and this white man who holds him says that he will cut out his heart and feed it to the fox," which was rather a bloodthirsty statement for so gentle a character as Barbara Harding; but she knew enough of the superstitious fears of the ancient Japanese to feel confident that this threat would have considerable weight with the subjects of the young Lord of Yoka.
Page 97
She had guessed nothing of the scoundrelly duplicity that had marked his first advances toward her.
Page 100
" "De Chinks might o' been shadowin' us--it wasn't safe to sleep," he admitted; "but I'll tear off a few dis mornin' after we find a feed of some kind.
Page 128
" CHAPTER XVIII.
Page 129
Theriere had thought him a coward, yet as he died he had said that he was the bravest man he ever had known.
Page 131
The surprised "hope" rushed in to punish his presuming foe.
Page 151
When the verse was completed he reached forth his hand and took the tin can in his strong fingers, raising it before his face.
Page 158
Detective sergeants were indigenous to the soil that grew corner saloons and poolrooms, and to none other--as well expect to discover one of Oda Yorimoto's samurai hiding behind a fire plug on Michigan Boulevard, as to look for one of those others along a farm-bordered road.
Page 180
Even Mexicans are not safe from him.
Page 188
As they talked a soldier came and announced that they were no longer prisoners--they were to have the freedom of the camp; "but," he concluded, "the general requests that you do not pass beyond the limits of the camp.
Page 192
Doubtless he would make him a colonel.
Page 235
Hey!" and he turned his face toward the door.
Page 240
Should she turn back? The horses might be between her and the river, but judgment told her.