The Beasts of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 146

upon the deck of the
unhappy Cowrie; but this time the blood which stained her white
planking was the blood of the guilty and not of the innocent.

Tarzan brought forth the men who had hidden in the forecastle, and
without promises of immunity from punishment forced them to help work
the vessel--the only alternative was immediate death.

A stiff breeze had risen with the sun, and with canvas spread the
Cowrie set in toward Jungle Island, where a few hours later, Tarzan
picked up Gust and bid farewell to Sheeta and the apes of Akut, for
here he set the beasts ashore to pursue the wild and natural life they
loved so well; nor did they lose a moment's time in disappearing into
the cool depths of their beloved jungle.

That they knew that Tarzan was to leave them may be doubted--except
possibly in the case of the more intelligent Akut, who alone of all the
others remained upon the beach as the small boat drew away toward the
schooner, carrying his savage lord and master from him.

And as long as their eyes could span the distance, Jane and Tarzan,
standing upon the deck, saw the lonely figure of the shaggy anthropoid
motionless upon the surf-beaten sands of Jungle Island.


It was three days later that the Cowrie fell in with H.M. sloop-of-war
Shorewater, through whose wireless Lord Greystoke soon got in
communication with London. Thus he learned that which filled his and
his wife's heart with joy and thanksgiving--little Jack was safe at
Lord Greystoke's town house.

It was not until they reached London that they learned the details of
the remarkable chain of circumstances that had preserved the infant
unharmed.

It developed that Rokoff, fearing to take the child aboard the Kincaid
by day, had hidden it in a low den where nameless infants were
harboured, intending to carry it to the steamer after dark.

His confederate and chief lieutenant, Paulvitch, true to the long years
of teaching of his wily master, had at last succumbed to the treachery
and greed that had always marked his superior, and, lured by the
thoughts of the immense ransom that he might win by returning the child
unharmed, had divulged the secret of its parentage to the woman who
maintained the foundling asylum. Through her he had arranged for the
substitution of another infant, knowing full well that never until it
was too late would Rokoff suspect the trick that had been played upon
him.

The woman had promised to keep the child until Paulvitch returned to
England; but she, in turn, had been tempted to betray

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