The Beasts of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 141

For a mile he continued upon his way to the relief
of Schmidt, but no signs saw he of the missing man or of any of the
apes of Akut.

At last he halted and called aloud the summons which he and Tarzan had
used to hail the great anthropoids. There was no response. Jones and
Sullivan came up with the black warrior as the latter stood voicing his
weird call. For another half-mile the black searched, calling
occasionally.

Finally the truth flashed upon him, and then, like a frightened deer,
he wheeled and dashed back toward camp. Arriving there, it was but a
moment before full confirmation of his fears was impressed upon him.
Lady Greystoke and the Mosula woman were gone. So, likewise, was
Schneider.

When Jones and Sullivan joined Mugambi he would have killed them in his
anger, thinking them parties to the plot; but they finally succeeded in
partially convincing him that they had known nothing of it.

As they stood speculating upon the probable whereabouts of the women
and their abductor, and the purpose which Schneider had in mind in
taking them from camp, Tarzan of the Apes swung from the branches of a
tree and crossed the clearing toward them.

His keen eyes detected at once that something was radically wrong, and
when he had heard Mugambi's story his jaws clicked angrily together as
he knitted his brows in thought.

What could the mate hope to accomplish by taking Jane Clayton from a
camp upon a small island from which there was no escape from the
vengeance of Tarzan? The ape-man could not believe the fellow such a
fool, and then a slight realization of the truth dawned upon him.

Schneider would not have committed such an act unless he had been
reasonably sure that there was a way by which he could quit Jungle
Island with his prisoners. But why had he taken the black woman as
well? There must have been others, one of whom wanted the dusky female.

"Come," said Tarzan, "there is but one thing to do now, and that is to
follow the trail."

As he finished speaking a tall, ungainly figure emerged from the jungle
north of the camp. He came straight toward the four men. He was an
entire stranger to all of them, not one of whom had dreamed that
another human being than those of their own camp dwelt upon the
unfriendly shores of Jungle Island.

It was Gust. He came directly to the point.

"Your women were stolen," he said.

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