The Beasts of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

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...The Beasts of Tarzan


By

Edgar Rice Burroughs




To Joan Burroughs




...

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...life; but
now there are others to consider. Unless I misjudge the man, he would
more...

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...the station and
ran up the steps to his London town house he was met at...

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...had attracted servants and members of the families from
residences near by, as well as from...

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...threat of refusing to aid them if Tarzan did
not come alone, and so they parted,...

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...seen. Had he guessed that his guide was Alexis Paulvitch he
would have realized that...

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...or egress. It was evident
that the room had been prepared for the very purpose...

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...fellow led her from the place, and together they walked quickly
toward the wharf and along...

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...listen, furtively
trying each latch.

All was silence, utter silence there, in which the throbbing of her...

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...a
double "s."

The man was tall and raw-boned, with a long yellow moustache, an
unwholesome complexion, and...

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...months to the two prisoners the little steamer
forged on they knew not where. Once...

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...sign of him.

"Lord Greystoke," commenced the Russian, "by your continued and wanton
interference with M. ...

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...never occurred to him as being within the realms of
probability. But he was determined...

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...so rash an act he halted
at the water's edge.

Thus he stood, his gaze riveted upon...

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...punishment has to do with what shall
presently befall your wife--that I shall leave to your...

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...conflict with
his kind. Once again he was Tarzan, son of Kala the she-ape.

His strong,...

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...little knot
of apes before him. It was the old Tarzan who shook his head...

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...day would have done so. Tarzan saw that the
beast was of wondrous proportions, standing...

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...they touched the ground he had gained the same hold upon
Akut that had broken Molak's...

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...could fashion from the materials at
hand.

Upon the shore he found an out-cropping of brittle, igneous...

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...the grace and
ease of a monkey. But for the heavy burden upon his heart...

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...his perch full upon the
back of the startled buck.

In another instant Numa would be upon...

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...the ill-natured Tublat, and which later had
developed into a wondrous effective weapon in the practised...

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...for all his noble birth, one whit less
savage than the wild, fierce thing he stalked.

As...

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...final agonized
lunge and shriek the great feline rolled over upon its side and, save
for the...

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...things the treatment was no
different from that which they accorded any other member of the...

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...upbringing of the child.

Tarzan shuddered as he thought of the cruel suffering the little one
must...

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...were broken.

Relaxing his bowstring, he returned the arrow to the quiver and,
throwing the bow about...

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...a long time Tarzan could not tell whether the beast was following
out of friendly feelings...

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...then upon the jungle air there rose in unison from two savage
throats the victory cry...

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...the panther, though doubtless some
subconscious suggestion, superinduced by this primary reason and aided
and abetted by...

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...perceptive faculties, so that the advancing
savages were almost upon him before he became aware that...

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...of this new noise
there broke upon their startled visions a sight that may well have
frozen...

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...upon the shoulder of the escaping Mugambi before he
was aware that he was being pursued,...

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...growled at
the stranger.

At the sight of the thing--a man mauling with his bare hands one...

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...a revolting fact; but had
we learned in childhood to eat these things, and had we...

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...hailed it with joy, nor had Mugambi been aware that it
was an island until Tarzan...

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...quiet them. At last calm was restored, and eventually the apes
became accustomed to the...

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...biting deep in an effort to reach the spine.

For several hundred yards the bellowing bull...

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...band down to the river, and
as he walked he gave vent to a series of...

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...horn, for
Kaviri was a crafty warrior, and it was in his mind to take no...

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...the canoe.

Kaviri was so busily engaged with the demons that had entered his own
craft that...

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...should not
have harmed you had you not set upon me. Tell me, what...

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...paddlers, whose
very fear added incitement to the beasts.

At Kaviri's camp Tarzan paused only long enough...

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...the shelter of their huts. Like frightened sheep they
ran, and behind them, driving them...

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...him by boat. He explained to Mugambi the thing that he
had in mind, and...

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...it always to some demon or other ghostly
visitor; but still he continued to call.

"Let me...

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...he was surrounded by a host of curious men, women, and
children.

From the chief he learned...

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...that night the ape-man swung rapidly through the
upper and middle terraces of the forest. ...

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...the sleeping visitor, nor any singing, nor loud
talking. He was remarkably solicitous lest his...

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...forefingers of the chief and his companion held them all
to perfect silence.

As they turned the...

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...village, nose to ground, halting at last close to the palisade,
where it almost touched the...

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...Tarzan, King of the Apes, the only one in all
the world fitted to find and...

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...broad daylight.

An instant later he heard the soft sound of a fur-clad body and padded
feet...

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...through which it had entered.

The man heard the soft scraping of the body as it...

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...savages inspired more
terror within their superstitious breasts than would the presence of
Sheeta, for they saw...

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...danger was not present.

He stepped close to the ape-man, and, seizing a spear from the...

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...fiends would devour him when the dance was
done caused him not a single qualm of...

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...been marooned the Kincaid
came to anchor in the mouth of a great river, and presently...

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...cut its
heart out before your very eyes. You'll learn what it means to insult
Nikolas...

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...will be sent ashore upon one pretext or another
except you and the child, Paulvitch and...

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...sank down upon her berth in utter
bewilderment. What was she to do? Suspicions...

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...he had there
arranged the details of his plan for the adventure upon which they were
now...

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...completed, she left them to their
own devices.

The Swede, after explaining in his gruff way that...

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...had proved himself in every way the
contrary since the day before. It scarce seemed...

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...he discovered to his chagrin that he could not make one of
them, not even the...

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...courage sufficient to sustain
them for a short charge toward the village, and even though he...

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...strenuous physical
exertion and nervous excitement. He rushed to Tarzan's side, and as
the first of...

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...to keep
him hot upon the trail. He was sure that Rokoff would be following
this...

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...to the kingship of the
apes of Kerchak.

The man was his prey--the black should not have...

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...catch us. Ay fight, but my
men they all run away. Then they...

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... A moment ago he had been upon the point of killing
this man. Now...

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...violent rain and
wind storms obliterated the last remnants of the spoor Tarzan
constantly though vainly sought.

During...

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...East Africa until he came upon natives from
whom he might gain information as to Rokoff's...

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...as it was
he that Tarzan was most anxious to interview, he lost no time in
entering...

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...to
note the sudden change in the fellow's attitude toward him. From
apparent dislike and suspicion...

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...saved her hut for
the night, hovered about the conspirators ostensibly to replenish the
supply of firewood...

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...left his country and gone he knows
not where?"

"Oh, they have not gone far," replied Tambudza....

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...I did not know about this one."

"There vasn't no other kid. Ay tank this...

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...of hideousness that she soon
lost all track of time. Whether they had been wandering...

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...word reached
them that Rokoff was but a few marches behind them, and that he had...

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...quickly as possible they deserted the three
whites.

Yet on and on went Anderssen and the girl....

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...no good at all. Think of the kid,
lady, and what it would be...

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...understand her words, but they saw the cause of her
trouble, and soon a young woman...

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...man of very different
appearance from M'ganwazam--so different, in fact, that Jane Clayton
immediately decided that he...

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...then his
eyes fell to the little bundle in her lap. Jane had drawn one...

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...ape you call
'husband,' what it means to interfere with the plans of Nikolas Rokoff.

"You have...

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...Russian could harm her further.

Just now she wanted time--time to think and prepare herself for...

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...girl could hear the
stealthy, muffled footfalls of great beasts, and ever round about them
rose the...

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...at last, half-conscious, she was
dragged within his tent.

Rokoff's boy had lighted the Russian's lamp, and...

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...savage jungle peopled by hideous beasts of prey and still more
hideous human beasts.

There was little...

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...stood outside the enclosure.

Behind her lay a fate worse than death, at the hands of...

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...themselves; but
the sailors were in no mood to brook his insults and his cursing.

In the...

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...an hour or more before he
should be able to wrest her from the Russian.

He knew...

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...protection both on
the long journey to the sea.

With bated breath she groped beneath the little...

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...waking hours of the cat family.

If the young woman was surprised by the sight of...

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...and piled far in the stern of the boat,
until at last, to her immense relief,...

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...had upon Jane
Clayton would she but permit him to share this means of escape that...

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...at certain points the black could see that the man and the woman
must have been...

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...of land and over
the rising promontory brought Tarzan, by a short cut, to the inward
bend...

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...of the Apes, Lord
of the Jungle, disappeared from the sight of men beneath the gloomy
waters...

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...in which he and
his party had come thus far upon their journey in pursuit of...

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...side hung a
monkey-ladder, but as the Russian grasped it to ascend to the deck he
heard...

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...a large reward they could be induced to carry her to
the nearest civilized port. ...

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...the ship, deep in drunken
slumber.

With a shudder of disgust she clambered above, and to the...

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...Darkness of the Night


When Tarzan of the Apes realized that he was in the grip...

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...that he could make his
way to the surface of the river beyond and then to...

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...seriously impeded
his progress. It was only with the greatest difficulty that he could
proceed faster...

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...to the ape-man whose idea
of speed had been gained by such standards as the lesser...

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...bank and
Mugambi and the horde upon the other. The cries of the Russian...

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...respite from their attentions which she had gained, and
with the conviction came a determination to...

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...put forth that they could be of service to her, and permitted them
to remain above.

For...

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...that he should find
one.

Without loss of time he piled his hideous fellows into the craft...

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...the occupants of the
other canoe, and it was this volley and the scream of the...

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...harm from two ruffians, which was enough excuse for the
ape-man to project his giant thews...

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...the terrible ferocity of the beasts the men were soon
scampering in all directions--those who still...

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...He had forgotten for the moment that
these were but beasts, unable to differentiate his friends...

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...only gnawed and broken bones.


Of the Russian's party, all were accounted for except Paulvitch. ...

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...he formed only to discard each either as impracticable,
or unworthy the vengeance his wrongs demanded....

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...him that had fallen from the lips of one of his former comrades ere
the poor...

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...they were not following him he wormed his way
through the bushes to the edge of...

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...weighed the
chances of the white man should physical encounter with the black
become necessary.

Only direct necessity...

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... Ruthless
hands seized the dead boy heartlessly and raised him to the low
gunwale. A...

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...been noted.

Stealthily he worked his craft forward until the stays of the bowsprit
were directly above...

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...a simple matter to clean up
the beasts. Where are they?"

"They're below," replied the sailor;...

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...the sailor. "If you get funny I may change my
mind, and keep you here...

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...the clockwork, lay a key, and this Paulvitch
now withdrew and fitted to the winding stem.

Gently...

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...vengeance of the thwarted Russian.




Chapter 19

The Last of the "Kincaid"


Shortly after the break of day...

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...also watching the land grow upward out of the
ocean. The beasts had sought the...

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...her
charred and smoking remains.

"It is useless to remain aboard her longer," remarked the ape-man to
the...

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...second explosion was less a mystery than that of the
first, the mate attributing it to...

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...he must do, for none other
could so surely go forth and return with meat as...

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... He had no love for authority, and certainly not
the slightest intention of submitting to...

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...companion the suspicions which he harboured
concerning the Swede. Momulla was for going immediately and...

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...you did a whole lot of loud talking, and there
isn't any doubt but that that...

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...men of the Cowrie.

But Momulla was even more curious than he was superstitious, and so...

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...times had he
sailed on English ships, so that he understood fairly well all that had
passed...

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...a day. Now at last they saw a feasible plan
for leaving the island...

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...he turned almost white beneath his tan.
Quite precipitately he left the cook's tent. ...

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...a feeling of greater relief than he had experienced for
many a day that he set...

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...if we do not hasten to his aid. You alone can call them off.
Take...

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... For a mile he continued upon his way to the relief
of Schmidt, but no...

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... "If you want ever to see them
again, come quickly and follow me. If...

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...the half-light of the beach. There was no
moon, but the sky was brilliant with...

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...by the time Akut and his
followers came down to the water all was ready for...

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...who fell into their clutches.

Sheeta, in the meanwhile, had felt his great fangs sink into...

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...upon the deck of the
unhappy Cowrie; but this time the blood which stained her white
planking...

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...her trust by the
lure of gold, and so had opened negotiations with Lord Greystoke's
solicitors for...