Tarzan the Terrible

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 88

"Bu-lat is a guest in the palace of Ko-tan,
my father. I do not know that he has faced any danger. It is to Bu-lat
that I am betrothed."

"But it is not Bu-lat whom you love," said Tarzan.

Again the flush and the girl half turned her face away. "Have I then
displeased the Great God?" she asked.

"No," replied Tarzan; "as I told you he is well satisfied and for your
sake he has saved Ta-den for you."

"Jad-ben-Otho knows all," whispered the girl, "and his son shares his
great knowledge."

"No," Tarzan hastened to correct her lest a reputation for omniscience
might prove embarrassing. "I know only what Jad-ben-Otho wishes me to
know."

"But tell me," she said, "I shall be reunited with Ta-den? Surely the
son of god can read the future."

The ape-man was glad that he had left himself an avenue of escape. "I
know nothing of the future," he replied, "other than what Jad-ben-Otho
tells me. But I think you need have no fear for the future if you
remain faithful to Ta-den and Ta-den's friends."

"You have seen him?" asked O-lo-a. "Tell me, where is he?"

"Yes," replied Tarzan, "I have seen him. He was with Om-at, the gund of
Kor-ul-JA."

"A prisoner of the Waz-don?" interrupted the girl.

"Not a prisoner but an honored guest," replied the ape-man.

"Wait," he exclaimed, raising his face toward the heavens; "do not
speak. I am receiving a message from Jad-ben-Otho, my father."

The two women dropped to their knees, covering their faces with their
hands, stricken with awe at the thought of the awful nearness of the
Great God. Presently Tarzan touched O-lo-a on the shoulder.

"Rise," he said. "Jad-ben-Otho has spoken. He has told me that this
slave girl is from the tribe of Kor-ul-JA, where Ta-den is, and that
she is betrothed to Om-at, their chief. Her name is Pan-at-lee."

O-lo-a turned questioningly toward Pan-at-lee. The latter nodded, her
simple mind unable to determine whether or not she and her mistress
were the victims of a colossal hoax. "It is even as he says," she
whispered.

O-lo-a fell upon her knees and touched her forehead to Tarzan's feet.
"Great is the honor that Jad-ben-Otho has done his poor servant," she
cried. "Carry to him my poor thanks for the happiness that he has
brought to O-lo-a."

"It would please my father," said Tarzan, "if you were to cause
Pan-at-lee to be returned in safety to the village of her people."

"What cares Jad-ben-Otho for such as she?" asked O-lo-a, a slight trace
of hauteur in her tone.

"There is but one god," replied Tarzan, "and

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