Tarzan the Terrible

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 193

of the Kor-ul-GRYF nor was the ape-man sorry
to see it depart since he had never known at what instant its short
temper and insatiable appetite for flesh might turn it upon some of his
companions.

Immediately upon their arrival at the gorge the march on A-lur was
commenced.



23

Taken Alive

As night fell a warrior from the palace of Ja-lur slipped into the
temple grounds. He made his way to where the lesser priests were
quartered. His presence aroused no suspicion as it was not unusual for
warriors to have business within the temple. He came at last to a
chamber where several priests were congregated after the evening meal.
The rites and ceremonies of the sacrifice had been concluded and there
was nothing more of a religious nature to make call upon their time
until the rites at sunrise.

Now the warrior knew, as in fact nearly all Pal-ul-don knew, that there
was no strong bond between the temple and the palace at Ja-lur and that
Ja-don only suffered the presence of the priests and permitted their
cruel and abhorrent acts because of the fact that these things had been
the custom of the Ho-don of Pal-ul-don for countless ages, and rash
indeed must have been the man who would have attempted to interfere
with the priests or their ceremonies. That Ja-don never entered the
temple was well known, and that his high priest never entered the
palace, but the people came to the temple with their votive offerings
and the sacrifices were made night and morning as in every other temple
in Pal-ul-don.

The warriors knew these things, knew them better perhaps than a simple
warrior should have known them. And so it was here in the temple that
he looked for the aid that he sought in the carrying out of whatever
design he had.

As he entered the apartment where the priests were he greeted them
after the manner which was customary in Pal-ul-don, but at the same
time he made a sign with his finger that might have attracted little
attention or scarcely been noticed at all by one who knew not its
meaning. That there were those within the room who noticed it and
interpreted it was quickly apparent, through the fact that two of the
priests rose and came close to him as he stood just within the doorway
and each of them, as he came, returned the signal that the warrior had
made.

The three talked for but a moment and then the warrior turned and left
the apartment. A little later one of the priests who had talked with
him left

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