Tarzan the Terrible

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 173

her
heart she prayed it. To be freed from the menace of this loathsome
creature were relief indeed. During all the balance of the night she
lay there awake, listening. Below her, she imagined, she could see the
dead man with his hideous face bathed in the cold light of the
moon--lying there upon his back staring up at her.

She prayed that JA might come and drag it away, but all during the
remainder of the night she heard never another sound above the drowsy
hum of the jungle. She was glad that he was dead, but she dreaded the
gruesome ordeal that awaited her on the morrow, for she must bury the
thing that had been Erich Obergatz and live on there above the shallow
grave of the man she had slain.

She reproached herself for her weakness, repeating over and over that
she had killed in self-defense, that her act was justified; but she was
still a woman of today, and strong upon her were the iron mandates of
the social order from which she had sprung, its interdictions and its
superstitions.

At last came the tardy dawn. Slowly the sun topped the distant
mountains beyond Jad-in-lul. And yet she hesitated to loosen the
fastenings of her door and look out upon the thing below. But it must
be done. She steeled herself and untied the rawhide thong that secured
the barrier. She looked down and only the grass and the flowers looked
up at her. She came from her shelter and examined the ground upon the
opposite side of the tree--there was no dead man there, nor anywhere as
far as she could see. Slowly she descended, keeping a wary eye and an
alert ear ready for the first intimation of danger.

At the foot of the tree was a pool of blood and a little trail of
crimson drops upon the grass, leading away parallel with the shore of
Jad-ben-lul. Then she had not slain him! She was vaguely aware of a
peculiar, double sensation of relief and regret. Now she would be
always in doubt. He might return; but at least she would not have to
live above his grave.

She thought some of following the bloody spoor on the chance that he
might have crawled away to die later, but she gave up the idea for fear
that she might find him dead nearby, or, worse yet badly wounded. What
then could she do? She could not finish him with her spear--no, she
knew that she could not do that, nor could she bring him back and nurse
him, nor

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with The Mad King

Page 31
They found themselves in a large, empty chamber, identical in size and shape with that which they had just quitted upon the floor below.
Page 33
"Stop!" she cried.
Page 35
Then from far below came a dull splash as the body of Bernard Custer struck the surface of the moat.
Page 49
After breathing his mount for a few minutes Barney swung himself into the saddle again and set off toward Tafelberg.
Page 70
" "I heard the man at Tafelberg tell another that he was the king," insisted the fellow.
Page 90
"I cannot understand what has happened, even now, your majesty," the old man was saying.
Page 93
It is not my fault that I loved you.
Page 97
What his purpose may be my friend does not know, but he warns us to be upon our guard.
Page 103
You may do much to win his undying gratitude, while for yourselves you may win to almost any height with the friendship of Austria behind you.
Page 111
"Whom do you seek?" inquired a woman's voice.
Page 113
"If you will get off of me," at last shouted the American, "I shall be glad to explain--and apologize.
Page 121
Barney, approaching through the trees, darting from one to another, was within a few paces of the man before he saw him.
Page 127
It was a Von der Tann that put the first Rubinroth king upon the throne of Lutha.
Page 133
Some day the Princess Emma, his daughter, will be my queen.
Page 140
At the frontier Barney was halted by an Austrian customs officer; but when the latter recognized the military car and the Austrian uniform of the driver he waved him through without comment.
Page 147
Upon the opposite side was a continuation of the wood.
Page 164
She was looking straight into his eyes.
Page 172
Serbia has withheld her forces at my request, but she will not withhold them for long.
Page 193
For a moment he lay in thought.
Page 211
Von Coblich committed suicide on the eve of his arrest.