Tarzan the Terrible

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 142

and
hatred that the pig-headed Hun had been assiduously fabricating beneath
his own person.

And at last it came, but from an unexpected source in the form of a
German native deserter from the theater of war. Footsore, weary, and
spent, he dragged himself into the village late one afternoon, and
before Obergatz was even aware of his presence the whole village knew
that the power of Germany in Africa was at an end. It did not take long
for the lieutenant's native soldiers to realize that the authority that
held them in service no longer existed and that with it had gone the
power to pay them their miserable wage. Or at least, so they reasoned.
To them Obergatz no longer represented aught else than a powerless and
hated foreigner, and short indeed would have been his shrift had not a
native woman who had conceived a doglike affection for Jane Clayton
hurried to her with word of the murderous plan, for the fate of the
innocent white woman lay in the balance beside that of the guilty
Teuton.

"Already they are quarreling as to which one shall possess you," she
told Jane.

"When will they come for us?" asked Jane. "Did you hear them say?"

"Tonight," replied the woman, "for even now that he has none to fight
for him they still fear the white man. And so they will come at night
and kill him while he sleeps."

Jane thanked the woman and sent her away lest the suspicion of her
fellows be aroused against her when they discovered that the two whites
had learned of their intentions. The woman went at once to the hut
occupied by Obergatz. She had never gone there before and the German
looked up in surprise as he saw who his visitor was.

Briefly she told him what she had heard. At first he was inclined to
bluster arrogantly, with a great display of bravado but she silenced
him peremptorily.

"Such talk is useless," she said shortly. "You have brought upon
yourself the just hatred of these people. Regardless of the truth or
falsity of the report which has been brought to them, they believe in
it and there is nothing now between you and your Maker other than
flight. We shall both be dead before morning if we are unable to escape
from the village unseen. If you go to them now with your silly
protestations of authority you will be dead a little sooner, that is
all."

"You think it is as bad as that?" he said, a noticeable alteration in
his tone and manner.

"It is precisely as I

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Text Comparison with At the Earth's Core

Page 0
At the Earth's Core By Edgar Rice Burroughs CONTENTS PROLOGUE I TOWARD THE ETERNAL FIRES II A STRANGE WORLD III A CHANGE OF MASTERS IV DIAN THE BEAUTIFUL V SLAVES VI THE BEGINNING OF HORROR VII FREEDOM VIII THE MAHAR TEMPLE IX THE FACE OF DEATH X PHUTRA AGAIN XI FOUR DEAD MAHARS XII PURSUIT XIII THE SLY ONE XIV THE GARDEN OF EDEN XV BACK TO EARTH PROLOGUE In the first place please bear in mind that I do not expect you to believe this story.
Page 1
Tell me the date.
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What with boxing, football, and baseball, I had been in training since childhood.
Page 11
If we are not ON earth, there is every reason to believe that we may be IN it.
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When they had examined me for a few moments one of them discovered that my clothing was not a part of me, with the result that garment by garment they tore it from me amidst peals of the wildest laughter.
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Their laughter ceased.
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Page 37
The dominant race of Pellucidar, David, have not yet learned that men converse among themselves, or reason.
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Page 56
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How long I should be alone was the next question to assail me as I swam frantically about once more in search of a means to escape.
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I had no idea that I should escape the monster that had marked me for his breakfast, but at least I should not die alone.
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I had spoken to the Sagoths as I had for the purpose of throwing them off the scent of my purposed attempt at escape.
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"Yes.
Page 102
" "But what had that to do with his brothers?" I asked.
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Page 113
The thing beneath the skin was not Dian--it was a hideous Mahar.