Tarzan the Terrible

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 123

one prison to another might offer some
possibility of escape. She weighed all these things and decided, for
Lu-don's quick glance at the thongs had not gone unnoticed nor
uninterpreted by her.

"Warrior," she said, addressing Ja-don, "if you would live enter not
that portion of the room."

Lu-don cast an angry glance upon her. "Silence, slave!" he cried.

"And where lies the danger?" Ja-don asked of Jane, ignoring Lu-don.

The woman pointed to the thongs. "Look," she said, and before the high
priest could prevent she had seized that which controlled the partition
which shot downward separating Lu-don from the warrior and herself.

Ja-don looked inquiringly at her. "He would have tricked me neatly but
for you," he said; "kept me imprisoned there while he secreted you
elsewhere in the mazes of his temple."

"He would have done more than that," replied Jane, as she pulled upon
the other thong. "This releases the fastenings of a trapdoor in the
floor beyond the partition. When you stepped on that you would have
been precipitated into a pit beneath the temple. Lu-don has threatened
me with this fate often. I do not know that he speaks the truth, but he
says that a demon of the temple is imprisoned there--a huge GRYF."

"There is a GRYF within the temple," said Ja-don. "What with it and the
sacrifices, the priests keep us busy supplying them with prisoners,
though the victims are sometimes those for whom Lu-don has conceived
hatred among our own people. He has had his eyes upon me for a long
time. This would have been his chance but for you. Tell me, woman, why
you warned me. Are we not all equally your jailers and your enemies?"

"None could be more horrible than Lu-don," she replied; "and you have
the appearance of a brave and honorable warrior. I could not hope, for
hope has died and yet there is the possibility that among so many
fighting men, even though they be of another race than mine, there is
one who would accord honorable treatment to a stranger within his
gates--even though she be a woman."

Ja-don looked at her for a long minute. "Ko-tan would make you his
queen," he said. "That he told me himself and surely that were
honorable treatment from one who might make you a slave."

"Why, then, would he make me queen?" she asked.

Ja-don came closer as though in fear his words might be overheard. "He
believes, although he did not tell me so in fact, that you are of the
race of gods. And why not? Jad-ben-Otho is tailless,

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with A Princess of Mars

Page 0
Contents # Foreword - 00:07:47 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 01 - 00:16:45 Read by: Peter Yearsley # Chapter 02 - 00:09:42 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 03 - 00:18:32 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 04 - 00:13:49 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 05 - 00:09:17 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 06 - 00:11:11 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 07 - 00:14:28 Read by: Kara Shallenberg # Chapter 08 - 00:11:36 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 09 - 00:07:59 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 10 - 00:19:11 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 11 - 00:17:02 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 12 - 00:13:49 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 13 - 00:13:17 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 14 - 00:21:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 15 - 00:20:57 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 16 - 00:23:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 17 - 00:19:03 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 18 - 00:10:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 19 - 00:14:28 Read by: Chris Vee # Chapter 20 - 00:16:33 Read by: Patrick McNeal # Chapter 21 - 00:21:45 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 22 - 00:23:47 Read by: Sherry Crowther # Chapter 23 - 00:13:24 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 24 - 00:16:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 25 - 00:11:59 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 26 - 00:14:52 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 27 - 00:11:41 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 28 - 00:05:31 Read by: Stephan Moebius Librivox Audio Recording Public Domain Certification: The person or persons who have associated work with this document (the "Dedicator" or "Certifier") hereby either (a) certifies that, to the best of his knowledge, the work of authorship identified is in the public domain of the country from which the work is published, or (b) hereby dedicates whatever copyright the dedicators holds in the work of authorship identified below (the "Work") to the public domain.
Page 1
the relinquishment of all rights to enforce (by lawsuit or otherwise) those copyrights in the Work.