Tarzan of the Apes

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 50

had it been
Sabor who had thus dragged him from his perch the outcome might have
been very different, for he would have lost his life, doubtless, into
the bargain.

It took him many days to braid a new rope, but when, finally, it was
done he went forth purposely to hunt, and lie in wait among the dense
foliage of a great branch right above the well-beaten trail that led to
water.

Several small animals passed unharmed beneath him. He did not want
such insignificant game. It would take a strong animal to test the
efficacy of his new scheme.

At last came she whom Tarzan sought, with lithe sinews rolling beneath
shimmering hide; fat and glossy came Sabor, the lioness.

Her great padded feet fell soft and noiseless on the narrow trail. Her
head was high in ever alert attention; her long tail moved slowly in
sinuous and graceful undulations.

Nearer and nearer she came to where Tarzan of the Apes crouched upon
his limb, the coils of his long rope poised ready in his hand.

Like a thing of bronze, motionless as death, sat Tarzan. Sabor passed
beneath. One stride beyond she took--a second, a third, and then the
silent coil shot out above her.

For an instant the spreading noose hung above her head like a great
snake, and then, as she looked upward to detect the origin of the
swishing sound of the rope, it settled about her neck. With a quick
jerk Tarzan snapped the noose tight about the glossy throat, and then
he dropped the rope and clung to his support with both hands.

Sabor was trapped.

With a bound the startled beast turned into the jungle, but Tarzan was
not to lose another rope through the same cause as the first. He had
learned from experience. The lioness had taken but half her second
bound when she felt the rope tighten about her neck; her body turned
completely over in the air and she fell with a heavy crash upon her
back. Tarzan had fastened the end of the rope securely to the trunk of
the great tree on which he sat.

Thus far his plan had worked to perfection, but when he grasped the
rope, bracing himself behind a crotch of two mighty branches, he found
that dragging the mighty, struggling, clawing, biting, screaming mass
of iron-muscled fury up to the tree and hanging her was a very
different proposition.

The weight of old Sabor was immense, and when she braced her huge paws
nothing less than Tantor, the elephant, himself, could

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