Tarzan of the Apes

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

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Tarzan of the Apes


By

Edgar Rice Burroughs




CONTENTS

I Out to Sea
II The Savage Home
III Life and Death
IV The Apes
V The White Ape
VI Jungle Battles
VII The Light of Knowledge
VIII The Tree-top Hunter
IX Man and Man
X The Fear-Phantom
XI "King of the Apes"
XII Man's Reason
XIII His Own Kind
XIV At the Mercy of the Jungle
XV The Forest God
XVI "Most Remarkable"
XVII Burials
XVIII The Jungle Toll
XIX The Call of the Primitive
XX Heredity
XXI The Village of Torture
XXII The Search Party
XXIII Brother Men
XXIV Lost Treasure
XXV The Outpost of the World
XXVI The Height of Civilization
XXVII The Giant Again
XXVIII Conclusion




Chapter I

Out to Sea


I had this story from one who had no business to tell it to me, or to
any other. I may credit the seductive influence of an old vintage upon
the narrator for the beginning of it, and my own skeptical incredulity
during the days that followed for the balance of the strange tale.

When my convivial host discovered that he had told me so much, and that
I was prone to doubtfulness, his foolish pride assumed the task the old
vintage had commenced, and so he unearthed written evidence in the form
of musty manuscript, and dry official records of the British Colonial
Office to support many of the salient features of his remarkable
narrative.

I do not say the story is true, for I did not witness the happenings
which it portrays, but the fact that in the telling of it to you I have
taken fictitious names for the principal characters quite sufficiently
evidences the sincerity of my own belief that it MAY be true.

The yellow, mildewed pages of the diary of

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Text Comparison with Tarzan of the Apes

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Tarzan of the Apes By Edgar Rice Burroughs CONTENTS I Out to Sea II The Savage Home III Life and Death IV The Apes V The White Ape VI Jungle Battles VII The Light of Knowledge VIII The Tree-top Hunter IX Man and Man X The Fear-Phantom XI "King of the Apes" XII Man's Reason XIII His Own Kind XIV At the Mercy of the Jungle XV The Forest God XVI "Most Remarkable" XVII Burials XVIII The Jungle Toll XIX The Call of the Primitive XX Heredity XXI The Village of Torture XXII The Search Party XXIII Brother Men XXIV Lost Treasure XXV The Outpost of the World XXVI The Height of Civilization XXVII The Giant Again XXVIII Conclusion Chapter I Out to Sea I had this story from one who had no business to tell it to me, or to any other.
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" Clayton remonstrated against the inhumanity of landing them upon an unknown shore to be left to the mercies of savage beasts, and, possibly, still more savage men.
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screams, or the stealthy moving of great bodies beneath them.
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Gently he lifted his wife's still unconscious form, and bore her to the little cabin, but it was fully two hours before she regained consciousness.
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He opened chests and cupboards, such as did not baffle his small experience, and in these he found the contents much better preserved.
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No word.
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Many travelers have seen the drums of the great apes, and some have heard the sounds of their beating and the noise of the wild, weird revelry of these first lords of the jungle, but Tarzan, Lord Greystoke, is, doubtless, the only human being who ever joined in the fierce, mad, intoxicating revel of the Dum-Dum.
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Like lightning the blows fell, and only ceased when Tarzan felt the limp form crumple beneath him.
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Tarzan had fastened the end of the rope securely to the trunk of the great tree on which he sat.
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That he was not far from home he was certain, so he took the trail at a rapid trot.
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Suddenly there came a hail from the edge of the clearing.
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Tarzan's knife on the present occasion but barely offset the gleaming fangs of Terkoz, and what little advantage the ape had over the man in brute strength was almost balanced by the latter's wonderful quickness and agility.
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Tarzan had seen the surprise caused by.
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He could not well negotiate the trees with his awkward burden, but he kept to the trails, and so made fairly good time.
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So they did not know that he was Tarzan of the Apes.
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One piercing scream escaped her lips as the brute hand clutched her arm.
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Soon the entire party had landed where stood Professor Porter, Mr.
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jungle searching for Jane Porter, where the noise of their own crashing through the underbrush would have drowned the report of a far distant gun.
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"Why?" "I am going there.
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Much more than is good for one man and you shall have all you need if ever we reach civilization.