Jungle Tales of Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 66

any might know the
whereabouts of her Tibo, it would be Bukawai, who was in friendly
intercourse with gods and demons, since a demon or a god it was who had
stolen her baby; but even her great mother love was sorely taxed to
find the courage to send her forth into the black jungle toward the
distant hills and the uncanny abode of Bukawai, the unclean, and his
devils.

Mother love, however, is one of the human passions which closely
approximates to the dignity of an irresistible force. It drives the
frail flesh of weak women to deeds of heroic measure. Momaya was
neither frail nor weak, physically, but she was a woman, an ignorant,
superstitious, African savage. She believed in devils, in black magic,
and in witchcraft. To Momaya, the jungle was inhabited by far more
terrifying things than lions and leopards--horrifying, nameless things
which possessed the power of wreaking frightful harm under various
innocent guises.

From one of the warriors of the village, whom she knew to have once
stumbled upon the lair of Bukawai, the mother of Tibo learned how she
might find it--near a spring of water which rose in a small rocky canyon
between two hills, the easternmost of which was easily recognizable
because of a huge granite boulder which rested upon its summit. The
westerly hill was lower than its companion, and was quite bare of
vegetation except for a single mimosa tree which grew just a little
below its summit.

These two hills, the man assured her, could be seen for some distance
before she reached them, and together formed an excellent guide to her
destination. He warned her, however, to abandon so foolish and
dangerous an adventure, emphasizing what she already quite well knew,
that if she escaped harm at the hands of Bukawai and his demons, the
chances were that she would not be so fortunate with the great
carnivora of the jungle through which she must pass going and returning.

The warrior even went to Momaya's husband, who, in turn, having little
authority over the vixenish lady of his choice, went to Mbonga, the
chief. The latter summoned Momaya, threatening her with the direst
punishment should she venture forth upon so unholy an excursion. The
old chief's interest in the matter was due solely to that age-old
alliance which exists between church and state. The local
witch-doctor, knowing his own medicine better than any other knew it,
was jealous of all other pretenders to accomplishments in the black
art. He long had heard of the power of Bukawai,

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Contents # Foreword - 00:07:47 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 01 - 00:16:45 Read by: Peter Yearsley # Chapter 02 - 00:09:42 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 03 - 00:18:32 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 04 - 00:13:49 Read by: Steve Hartzog # Chapter 05 - 00:09:17 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 06 - 00:11:11 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 07 - 00:14:28 Read by: Kara Shallenberg # Chapter 08 - 00:11:36 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 09 - 00:07:59 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 10 - 00:19:11 Read by: Tony Hightower # Chapter 11 - 00:17:02 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 12 - 00:13:49 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 13 - 00:13:17 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 14 - 00:21:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 15 - 00:20:57 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 16 - 00:23:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 17 - 00:19:03 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 18 - 00:10:39 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 19 - 00:14:28 Read by: Chris Vee # Chapter 20 - 00:16:33 Read by: Patrick McNeal # Chapter 21 - 00:21:45 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 22 - 00:23:47 Read by: Sherry Crowther # Chapter 23 - 00:13:24 Read by: Stephan Moebius # Chapter 24 - 00:16:13 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 25 - 00:11:59 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 26 - 00:14:52 Read by: Chris Peterson # Chapter 27 - 00:11:41 Read by: Kymm Zuckert # Chapter 28 - 00:05:31 Read by: Stephan Moebius Librivox Audio Recording Public Domain Certification: The person or persons who have associated work with this document (the "Dedicator" or "Certifier") hereby either (a) certifies that, to the best of his knowledge, the work of authorship identified is in the public domain of the country from which the work is published, or (b) hereby dedicates whatever copyright the dedicators holds in the work of authorship identified below (the "Work") to the public domain.
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