At the Earth's Core

By Edgar Rice Burroughs

Page 91

by the
twisting and turning of the canyons and gullies, for I did not come to
the land of Sari then, nor for a long time thereafter.




XIV

THE GARDEN OF EDEN


With no heavenly guide, it is little wonder that I became confused and
lost in the labyrinthine maze of those mighty hills. What, in reality,
I did was to pass entirely through them and come out above the valley
upon the farther side. I know that I wandered for a long time, until
tired and hungry I came upon a small cave in the face of the limestone
formation which had taken the place of the granite farther back.

The cave which took my fancy lay halfway up the precipitous side of a
lofty cliff. The way to it was such that I knew no extremely
formidable beast could frequent it, nor was it large enough to make a
comfortable habitat for any but the smaller mammals or reptiles. Yet
it was with the utmost caution that I crawled within its dark interior.

Here I found a rather large chamber, lighted by a narrow cleft in the
rock above which let the sunlight filter in in sufficient quantities
partially to dispel the utter darkness which I had expected. The cave
was entirely empty, nor were there any signs of its having been
recently occupied. The opening was comparatively small, so that after
considerable effort I was able to lug up a bowlder from the valley
below which entirely blocked it.

Then I returned again to the valley for an armful of grasses and on
this trip was fortunate enough to knock over an orthopi, the diminutive
horse of Pellucidar, a little animal about the size of a fox terrier,
which abounds in all parts of the inner world. Thus, with food and
bedding I returned to my lair, where after a meal of raw meat, to which
I had now become quite accustomed, I dragged the bowlder before the
entrance and curled myself upon a bed of grasses--a naked, primeval,
cave man, as savagely primitive as my prehistoric progenitors.

I awoke rested but hungry, and pushing the bowlder aside crawled out
upon the little rocky shelf which was my front porch. Before me spread
a small but beautiful valley, through the center of which a clear and
sparkling river wound its way down to an inland sea, the blue waters of
which were just visible between the two mountain ranges which embraced
this little paradise. The sides of the opposite hills were green with
verdure, for

Last Page Next Page

Text Comparison with At the Earth's Core

Page 2
I remember that he used to claim that that invention alone would make us fabulously wealthy--we were going to make the whole thing public after the successful issue of our first secret trial--but Perry never returned from that trial trip, and I only after ten years.
Page 4
There would seem to me to be about one chance in several million that we shall succeed--otherwise we shall die more quickly but no more surely than as though we sat supinely waiting for the torture of a slow and horrible death.
Page 12
Had I still retained the suspicion that we were on earth the sight that met my eyes would quite entirely have banished it.
Page 17
Again I was the center of a wildly chattering horde.
Page 25
She was shocked.
Page 26
Mahars largely by comparisons.
Page 39
The Hairy One only considered the horrible fate that would be ours were we discovered; but at last I prevailed upon him to accept my plan as the only feasible one, and when I had assured him that I would take all the responsibility for it were we captured, he accorded a reluctant assent.
Page 40
Benches surrounded this open space upon three sides, and along the fourth were heaped huge bowlders which rose in receding tiers toward the roof.
Page 44
As the animal's fierce clawing ceased, the bull raised his gory, sightless head, and with a horrid roar ran headlong across the arena.
Page 62
Clumps of strange trees dotted the landscape here and there almost to the water, and rank grass and ferns grew between.
Page 65
I imagine the slow-witted sithic, as Ja called him, suddenly realized our.
Page 67
"Men say that they are visible from half Pellucidar," he replied.
Page 74
" The guards in whose hands I now found myself, upon hearing that I had returned of my own volition to Phutra evidently felt that it would be safe to give me liberty within the building as had been the custom before I had escaped, and so I was told to return to whatever duty had been mine formerly.
Page 86
On either side rose precipitous cliffs of gorgeous, parti-colored rock, while beneath our feet a thick mountain grass formed a soft and noiseless carpet.
Page 88
Evidently he had seen enough of me for the moment.
Page 93
Some fifty feet from the base I came upon a projection which formed a natural path along the face of the cliff, and this I followed out over the sea toward the cliff's end.
Page 110
They could not comprehend that the lower orders had suddenly developed a power which rendered them really formidable.
Page 113
Frantically.
Page 114
That I ever shall see her again seems but remotely possible, for how may I know upon what part of Pellucidar my return journey may terminate--and how, without a north or south or an east or a west may I hope ever to find my way across that vast world to the tiny spot where my lost love lies grieving for me? That is the story as David Innes told it to me in the goat-skin tent upon the rim of the great Sahara Desert.
Page 115
I had it packed on a special reel at his suggestion, as it was his idea that he could fasten one end here before he left and by paying it out through the end of the prospector lay a telegraph line between the outer and inner worlds.